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Move along: are these the weirdest mobile homes you’ve seen?

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Slideshow

Jesse Dodd

30 March 2017

New book Mobitecture: Architecture on the Move celebrates the mobile home in all forms, not just tents and caravans but sleds, pods, floating platforms and more - many built to challenge or celebrate sustainable ways of building and housing.

250 designs experiment with the issues around housing for those on the economic or environmental fringes of life - there’s a bigger need for sustainable, dignified mobile housing than ever before. 

While some of Mobitecture: Architecture on the Move (by Rebecca Roke, Phaidon) might be more art than home, each piece starts a conversation.

View as a slideshow

Y Bio in Mobitecture

Y bio

A modular camping structure designed for the windy coast of Crimea, this structure uses tetrahedral modules to create different areas out of fabric slings. It can be a place to relax, a beach house or even a cafe, the low impact structure can be expanded or contracted to suit different needs. Archinoma, Ukraine, 2009. Steel framing, canvas, timber, steel staircase.


Aventozav

Park bench bubble in Mobitecture

Park bench bubble

Thor ter Kulve’s design turns a public bench into a private space that has a solar-powered USB charger. The bubble cocoon strips back what a home needs to the bare essentials - power and shelter and is made from scavenged materials. He was inspired by spending time in London and Amsterdam. Thor ter Kulve, UK, 2014. Recycled timber, nylon, solar panel, USB charging station.


Namuun Zimmerman

Camper bike in Mobitecture

Camper bike

An antidote to the American craze for large RV’s Kevin Cyr’s slim camper bike is powered by pedalling and uses a Chinese tricycle. While many Asian countries see huge goods balanced precariously on bikes, Cyr uses it to balance a home using this artwork to compare the American and Chinese methods of transport. Kevin Cyr, USA, 2008. Tricycle, corrugated aluminium, Plexiglas, plywood, timber.


Kevin Cyr

Nomad sauna in Mobitecture

Nomad sauna

Twenty design students created this mobile sauna in response to changing climate conditions in Norway. It has an open stove and seating area, room for fuel and a ready made hole to jump into the icy water. It can be moved across frozen lakes or used as a platform near a lake beach in the summer. Marco Casagrande, Norway, 2012. Timber, metal.


Casagrande & Bjørnådal

Camper cart in Mobitecture

Camper kart

Shopping trolley becomes mobile home here with a retractable sleeping deck and durable roof. Everything can be packed away and unpacked at the turn of a crank. The shopping trolley has long been associated with the homeless and here Kevin Cyr turns it into an actual dwelling. Kevin Cyr, USA, 2009. Steel shopping cart, chipboard, nylon, canvas.


Kevin Cyr

Weekend bike in Mobitecture

Weekend bike

A comment on the chaotic nature of shantytown dwellings with their lack of comfort, Carlos No has created an uncomfortable precarious home made from scavenged materials. It magnifies the lack of resources and luxury that those living in poverty endure and the difficult fragility of their homes. Carlos No, Portugal, 2012. Moto-tricycle, timber, PVC, glass, nylon.


Susana Dinis

Y Bio in Mobitecture

1 / 6

Y bio

A modular camping structure designed for the windy coast of Crimea, this structure uses tetrahedral modules to create different areas out of fabric slings. It can be a place to relax, a beach house or even a cafe, the low impact structure can be expanded or contracted to suit different needs. Archinoma, Ukraine, 2009. Steel framing, canvas, timber, steel staircase.


Aventozav
Park bench bubble in Mobitecture

2 / 6

Park bench bubble

Thor ter Kulve’s design turns a public bench into a private space that has a solar-powered USB charger. The bubble cocoon strips back what a home needs to the bare essentials - power and shelter and is made from scavenged materials. He was inspired by spending time in London and Amsterdam. Thor ter Kulve, UK, 2014. Recycled timber, nylon, solar panel, USB charging station.


Namuun Zimmerman
Camper bike in Mobitecture

3 / 6

Camper bike

An antidote to the American craze for large RV’s Kevin Cyr’s slim camper bike is powered by pedalling and uses a Chinese tricycle. While many Asian countries see huge goods balanced precariously on bikes, Cyr uses it to balance a home using this artwork to compare the American and Chinese methods of transport. Kevin Cyr, USA, 2008. Tricycle, corrugated aluminium, Plexiglas, plywood, timber.


Kevin Cyr
Nomad sauna in Mobitecture

4 / 6

Nomad sauna

Twenty design students created this mobile sauna in response to changing climate conditions in Norway. It has an open stove and seating area, room for fuel and a ready made hole to jump into the icy water. It can be moved across frozen lakes or used as a platform near a lake beach in the summer. Marco Casagrande, Norway, 2012. Timber, metal.


Casagrande & Bjørnådal
Camper cart in Mobitecture

5 / 6

Camper kart

Shopping trolley becomes mobile home here with a retractable sleeping deck and durable roof. Everything can be packed away and unpacked at the turn of a crank. The shopping trolley has long been associated with the homeless and here Kevin Cyr turns it into an actual dwelling. Kevin Cyr, USA, 2009. Steel shopping cart, chipboard, nylon, canvas.


Kevin Cyr
Weekend bike in Mobitecture

6 / 6

Weekend bike

A comment on the chaotic nature of shantytown dwellings with their lack of comfort, Carlos No has created an uncomfortable precarious home made from scavenged materials. It magnifies the lack of resources and luxury that those living in poverty endure and the difficult fragility of their homes. Carlos No, Portugal, 2012. Moto-tricycle, timber, PVC, glass, nylon.


Susana Dinis

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