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Brighton gets #StreetsAhead of plastic pollution

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Brighton gets #StreetsAhead of plastic pollution

News

A new campaign has launched in Brighton to remind visitors and locals how much plastic rubbish is a menace to the ocean.

    Georgina Wilson-Powell

    Mon 28 Aug 2017

    Plastic waste and rubbish has become a problem for the iconic seaside town, research reports that 8 out 10 residents are fed up with the amount of litter, so Brighton and Hove Council, along with Hubbub have come up with a campaign to stem the tide of rubbish.

    The famous Brighton promenade is now home to an enormous fish made from plastic waste and there are new signs reminding people to bin their waste. There’s also a trash converter van where people can trade their litter for treats and there will be other activities hitting the beach.

    Streets Ahead Hubbub rubbish campaign in Brighton

    Step up your rubbish game with #StreetsAhead in Brighton

    Being a tourist destination (tourism brings £845 million to Brighton & Hove’s economy each year and 82% of tourists visit for the beach) comes with its downsides, the council remove up to five van loads of rubbish from the beaches every day.

    And if it’s not removed it gets washed into the sea, where it can either be mistaken for food by fish or it eventually breaks down into microparticles and enters the food chain.

    Rebecca Dove, managing director of Hubbub said, “The amount of litter entering the sea is massive, and increasing. 35% of fish off the coast of Britain have plastic in their gut and 80% of ocean plastic comes from land-based sources. Litter in the sea takes centuries to break down and is harmful to birds, fish and other species. Brighton has a fantastic opportunity to lead the solution to tackle the issue of litter entering the sea along Britain’s coastline which is contributing to a pressing global issue."

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