Oh mother, no frills has never looked so good

Ethically conscious, east London fashion label Mother of Pearl's new No Frills collection is a lesson in stylish sustainability. We find out more.

Georgina Wilson-Powell 10 September 2018

http://bit.ly/2CA62UF

Mother of Pearl, under the creative direction of Amy Powney, is already testament to what can be done when you think consciously about slow fashion, but its new ready to wear line, No Frills, puts the mindful manufacturing process front and centre.

The first collection is all about wardrobe staples that will be core classics for years to come. 

Stylish not trendy, these future heritage pieces offer up a version of fashion that's luxurious without being louche. The pieces are made of 100% sustainable cotton and wool to reduce reliance on man-made fibres. A pair of trousers (in a textured floral jacquard) has even been created from a blend of organic wool and cotton developed exclusively for No Frills.

The collection has everything you'd expect from the cult British label, including the elegant mix of masculine tailoring with feminine details and the brand's iconic pearl additions. Wide leg denim trousers, boxy bold jackets and statement shirts let you work it at work, while the 90s inspired button up dresses nail weekends.

Having grown up off-grid in the north east, Powney is no stranger to unravelling where things come from and heading back to the source. 

Over the last two years she's traced each part of her supply chain to the start - from meeting the farmers growing organic cotton in the fields in Turkey to sheep farmers in Uruguay and ensuring each part is as ethically produced as possible, including keep the air miles of the garments as low as she can.

Its organic cotton denim, for instance, is grown, woven and spun in Turkey in a process that uses minimal water consumption and organic dyes, in a factory powered by recaptured steam that helps rehabilitate and integrate ex-prisoners.

But arguably, what's more important is that No Frills satisfies that itch for a gorgeous, luxurious purchase that you'll love for years to come without adding to the mass-production problem and proves serious fashion can be sustainable and stylish.

Georgina Wilson-Powell 10 September 2018

http://bit.ly/2CA62UF

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